So, I finally got around to reading The Knife of Never Letting Go. I know everybody loves this book. I kinda hated it. The dog constantly talks about poo (I get it, but…come on. Really?). Everyone is miserable. Throw in the world’s most unsatisfying ending–you almost have to read the next one or be left with a major cliffhanger, ...
After two adventure-filled novels, Promised has lots of plot to deal with and loose ends to wrap up. O’Brien does a nice job, here. Gaia has a lot to do, between saving herself, her family, and …for the sake of spoilers, let’s just say a lot of other people, but she manages to pull things off, and have some ...
I enjoyed Prized every bit as much as Birthmarked, the first in the series. I was thrown, here and there, by O’Brien’s writing style; there were a couple of conversations that confused me a little, because the characters were expressing emotions that we were supposed to understand they’d been feeling, when they hadn’t been clear at all. I found ...
I wasn't, initially, terribly interested in reading Wither, because: polygamy? Really? I just wasn't feeling it. But after beginning two other books that were pretty miserably written, I decided to give Wither a try. It's actually shockingly good. I found myself completely sucked in to De Stefano's world. The fact that Rhine's been kidnapped helps, from a reader's point of ...
There were parts of Blackbird House I absolutely delighted in, and others I just felt lukewarm about. I'm not generally much for short stories--I like my reading to have some thread of plot or continuity. Happily, Hoffman accomplishes exactly this with Blackbird House: each story moves forward a generation, but takes a character from the last, and each centers ...
The overwhelming impression I got from Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Childrenwas how darned overblown the whole thing was. The story’s not bad. I didn’t find myself dying to pick it up again each night, but once I did it was entertaining enough. I guess I just couldn’t figure out what all the hype was about. The pictures, by the ...
Ashfall was a nice departure: it's so nice to read a post-apocalyptic novel based in actual fact! I love fiction, and don't mind at all if something is spun from pure imagination, but I hate it when something is presented as "science" and even an right-brained lay person like me can spot the flaws. This was interesting and well-researched, ...
Overall, I felt warm-ish about Birthmarked. When it began, I found it maybe a little juvenile. At some point, I found myself shocked to discover that the book does not take place in some sort of medieval period–rather, it’s more dystopian. Either I missed that explanation completely, or it’s just not made clear at all. There’s a bit of ...
I’ve been struggling with how I feel about Partials. I want to like it? I kinda like it? I wouldn’t say I didn’t enjoy reading Partials–it wasn’t a chore, but it wasn’t a book I found myself in a hurry to get back to whenever I had free time. I can’t quite figure out why. The plot was interesting, ...
I've had this bizarre romantic fantasy for a while, now, that at some future time, I might like to own a (SMALL) farm, and so I keep picking up books on the subject, hoping they'll shed some light on the idea. Kimball's The Dirty Life is the first I've come across that I actually found helpful and, simultaneously, fascinating. ...